Misr ! Misr ! Misr !Misr ! Misr ! Misr !

As almost everybody in Egypt, we watched the news live on tv.

Tired of received the news either with a two-days delay or from Europe by phone, I finally decided to settle a satellite dish on the roof of the hotel (which didn’t have any television). Those last days, I was watching Al-Jazeera or BBC World, while working on the hotel’s accountability.

So since the beginning of the afternoon something was obviously underway. Al-Jazeera was annoucing an “important and urgent” statement from the Armed Forces Supreme Council, which was in permanent session. The crowds, still peaceful, was gathering not only in Liberation Square, but also around the institutions of the regime (Parliament, Government, State television, Presidential palace…) blocking acces to those. Military choppers arrived at the President’s palace…

And then, Al-Jazeera finally announced that Egyptian State television had launched the opening credits of official statements. I just had time to call (ok, shout) the hotel owner’s wife who was on the terrace, and then I switched to public TV. Suleiman appeared, bolt upright, as a Soviet sentry (probably an old souvenir from his education in Moscow), starting a short statement in Arabic… which I don’t

understand. Until Mrs Amal bursts with joy and starts yelling souts between two “al-hamdulilah”, “thanks be to God” !

In the evening, a real festival would happen at the hotel, from the restaurant to the terraces, where the village inhabitants, friends and family gathered to celebrate this historic moment. A simple and easy-to-share euphoria, the happiness to be “free at last”. Egyptian flags mixed with Nubian music until early morning, announcing a new day, and a new Egypt, celebrated by simple cries of joy: “Misr ! Misr ! Misr !” (“Egypt ! Egypt ! Egypt !”).As almost everybody in Egypt, we watched the news live on tv.

Tired of received the news either with a two-days delay or from Europe by phone, I finally decided to settle a satellite dish on the roof of the hotel (which didn’t have any television). Those last days, I was watching Al-Jazeera or BBC World, while working on the hotel’s accountability.

So since the beginning of the afternoon something was obviously underway. Al-Jazeera was annoucing an “important and urgent” statement from the Armed Forces Supreme Council, which was in permanent session. The crowds, still peaceful, was gathering not only in Liberation Square, but also around the institutions of the regime (Parliament, Government, State television, Presidential palace…) blocking acces to those. Military choppers arrived at the President’s palace…

And then, Al-Jazeera finally announced that Egyptian State television had launched the opening credits of official statements. I just had time to call (ok, shout) the hotel owner’s wife who was on the terrace, and then I switched to public TV. Suleiman appeared, bolt upright, as a Soviet sentry (probably an old souvenir from his education in Moscow), starting a short statement in Arabic… which I don’t

understand. Until Mrs Amal bursts with joy and starts yelling souts between two “al-hamdulilah”, “thanks be to God” !

In the evening, a real festival would happen at the hotel, from the restaurant to the terraces, where the village inhabitants, friends and family gathered to celebrate this historic moment. A simple and easy-to-share euphoria, the happiness to be “free at last”. Egyptian flags mixed with Nubian music until early morning, announcing a new day, and a new Egypt, celebrated by simple cries of joy: “Misr ! Misr ! Misr !” (“Egypt ! Egypt ! Egypt !”).

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